Controls to complement By-laws

Consultation has concluded

In August 2016, Council resolved to adopt new By-laws for the District Council of Yankalilla. These By-laws come into effect between Christmas and New Year. To complement the by-laws, Council is reviewing controls relevant to each by-law and are undertaking public consultation on these controls which mainly relate to:

· where and how dogs can be exercised

· where vehicles can access beaches

· where livestock (ie horses) can access a beach

Maps

The maps provided in the document library (right hand panel) have been created as a guide only with the aim of giving a visual representation of where the proposed controls will be applied.

In August 2016, Council resolved to adopt new By-laws for the District Council of Yankalilla. These By-laws come into effect between Christmas and New Year. To complement the by-laws, Council is reviewing controls relevant to each by-law and are undertaking public consultation on these controls which mainly relate to:

· where and how dogs can be exercised

· where vehicles can access beaches

· where livestock (ie horses) can access a beach

Maps

The maps provided in the document library (right hand panel) have been created as a guide only with the aim of giving a visual representation of where the proposed controls will be applied.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
  • I have noted that the south bay has been designated as dogs on lead . this seems illogical as it is splitting the area and will be affecting more people that having the north bay designated as dogs on a lead . The plovers have a presence all along the beaches and to identify one area would be seen as discriminatory to the majority of ratepayers in this area. The question is Was the North Bay considered for the designated area for dogs on a lead?

    jclancy29 asked over 2 years ago

    The proposed area designated for dogs on lead at the south bay is not necessarily considering the environmental fauna only. Currently there is an area on the beach from the Carrickalinga beach access point by the toilet block and for 100 metres north, and for 100 metres south, where existing controls require dogs to be leashed. The primary reason for the control is because, in general, the area is considered to cater for a higher density of beach users who will occupy a spot for their time at the beach. As the review is considering controls which have been in place for over seven years and considering the increase in users of that area, it is proposed to extend the area of control for approximately 400 metres north and 400 metres south of the beach access point by the toilet block. We welcome the feedback from our residents and visitors alike to enable appropriate and justifiable decision making.

  • Why are the proposed bye laws even stricter than those of other Adelaide city councils - where the beaches are used by far more people than those beaches in Yankalilla Council's control? The number of people using the local beaches would not compare with those of Henley and Grange beaches in Adelaide.

    JULIACLANCY asked over 2 years ago

    We aim to find an acceptable balance when considering the use of our natural coastline in the Yankalilla District. While we wish for people to enjoy our special place, much of our coastline can be considered environmentally sensitive so sometimes it becomes quite a challenge. We believe in this case the beaches which attract the most use from people have been adequately catered for, whilst remaining sympathetic to the local wildlife and in particular the endangered Hooded Plover species. We note that while 13 kms of coastline in an Adelaide Council area requires dogs to be on a lead between 10am and 8pm during the daylight savings period, the coastline between Carrickalinga Head and the southern end of Lady Bay has many areas in which dogs can be exercised off the lead all year around.