STRUCTURE PLAN for Yankalilla Normanville and Carrickalinga

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Consultation has concluded

The draft Final Structure Plan builds upon the District 30 Year Plan (adopted by Council in 2009 after an extensive engagement process with the community) and provides a long term perspective of how the towns of Yankalilla, Normanville and Carrickalinga might look and operate in the future, by updating and progressing the work previously done by Council and the Community in the 2009 District 30 Year Plan (Stage 1). The rate at which the towns change will depend on a number of factors but it is important that the community’s aspirations are expressed to serve as a guide for planning, investment and environmental management

The Plan incorporates feedback gathered during the public consultation process undertaken from October until December 2013 that resulted in 60 submissions being received, in addition to the contributions made at public forums and presentations during that period.

Council has placed the draft Final Structure Plan on consultation to encourage any further community contributions before finalising the report.

The draft Final Structure Plan builds upon the District 30 Year Plan (adopted by Council in 2009 after an extensive engagement process with the community) and provides a long term perspective of how the towns of Yankalilla, Normanville and Carrickalinga might look and operate in the future, by updating and progressing the work previously done by Council and the Community in the 2009 District 30 Year Plan (Stage 1). The rate at which the towns change will depend on a number of factors but it is important that the community’s aspirations are expressed to serve as a guide for planning, investment and environmental management

The Plan incorporates feedback gathered during the public consultation process undertaken from October until December 2013 that resulted in 60 submissions being received, in addition to the contributions made at public forums and presentations during that period.

Council has placed the draft Final Structure Plan on consultation to encourage any further community contributions before finalising the report.

Guest Book

Please take the time to let us know what you think of this important Plan.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

With Tourism a key feature of this plan, may i suggest more attractions for tourists.Primary consideration should be the natural environment as this is likely to be the main drawcard to the region.Thus if a Conservation park could be planned it would certainly draw in the tourists along with wildlife.Furthermore a regeneration of Ingalalla falls, back to its original native beauty would be a good start. Locals and tourists are attracted to the region to see its native beauty rather than european plant life, thus native street trees would be more appropriate.On the matter of housing development, may i suggest that the development that does occur be unique and distinct to a country region to attract people over other development elsewhere, and development that is more sensitive to the local ecology. Thus a model such as what occurred at the Aldinga Arts Eco Village would be perfect. It is less expensive in regard to council maintenance costs and this model encourages greater community connectedness and collaboration.Otherwise its a great plan.Thank you for your consideration.

Garry about 3 years ago

I object to the proposed placing of storage shed on land beside the Bungala river for many reason, most of which are in responses already her. I object very strongly.

maurenemcewen about 3 years ago

All these plans are pointless if the council rates are so expensive residents can not afford to live here. Why are we 22% dearer than Alexandrina and 33% dearer than Victor Harbor. Many of our roads are in a shocking state and footpaths unusable. Surely such items should be attended to first. Will this council ever learn to live within it's means and stop trying to expand (especially concerning tourism) without maintaining what it already has.. Why would any sane council contemplate industrial development in the green belt between Yankalilla and Normanville.

Martin about 3 years ago

I'm not going to talk about impact / aesthetics on environment, bungala....Traffic management is the main issue...Imagine turning in and out on the yankalilla straight....Blocking a main artery....Stupid to build commerce on this road...It's bad enough in yank, and normanville to cape turnoff..There is no foresight or planning for these growing problems....

Jeff prior about 3 years ago

For the life of me, I fail to understand why any responsible council would even contemplate the suggestion of allowing development of any type, let alone storage sheds along the green belt area between Yankalilla and normanville, what an eyesore, besides that no one wants the two townships bought closer together, apart from maybe, the council, begs the question, WHY?

Rick about 3 years ago

Strongly oppose the proposed buildings/ bulk storage being built between Normanville and Yankalilla. Keep the towns separate identities with a green belt as proposed in the 2030 plan. We agree heartily with Guy Marons letter. Ray and Val Beavis Normanville

RayandVal about 3 years ago

Using the last piece of open space on the Bungala side of Main South Rd for semi-industrial development is madness and contrary to the 30 year plan and the current development plan's objectives. Yes there are traffic problems on Main South Rd but finding a bypass will be difficult and will be even more difficult to convince DPTI to fund one. Therefore it would seem prudent to stabilise the traffic load on the main arterial between the two towns until such funding might be available. Limiting traffic volumes by minimising development along what should be a green and pleasant space is one way forward.

Geoff N about 3 years ago

OUTRAGED , DISGUSTED , APPALLED , and bitterly disappointed that this plan is the result of your efforts. Yet not surprised as you consistently ignore the ideas and desires of your RATEPAYERS. This plan goes against nearly everything this community holds dear and important about our area. Rural outlook, seperation of towns, Bungala Linear park vision, traffic flows. i think that these arguments have been so well put by Guy and others on this site.

malcolm putland about 3 years ago

I absolutely oppose the positiong of the service station & more particularly the bulk storage sheds between Yank & Normanville - I cannot imagine why council would have thought this was a good idea - aside from being an eyesore between the towns & ruining the aspect, this will make Yank / Normanville like all the other poorly planned & 'ruined' rural townships throughout the state. Surely, we can do better than that?

usanPp about 3 years ago

I am opposed to the land use on South Road between Yankalilla and Normanville being rezoned for commercial use.

M Speed about 3 years ago

As a resident and ratepayer, I am not in favour of rezoning the area between Yankalilla and Normanville for bulk storage and warehousing. I work with the public and there is a lot of negative talk out there about such matters but people do not want to get involved because they say 'nothing will be done, it is a waste of our time'. Please take into consideration the views of the people who actually live in the area before the decision is made.As Gayle Jones said, others more articulate have already expressed their concerns and I fully support their submissions. I particularly agree with Steve Cracknell's views.

Schlibbles about 3 years ago

Dear Council, I think it's wonderful that our towns have a good future. The only thing I am concerned about is where you are thinking of putting the bulky goods area. We moved here 7 and a half years ago because we wanted to live closer to nature and away from all the city "traps" such as high traffic and too many buildings.Is there an alternative place to keep these kinds of retail businesses away from the residential areas? I think it would be an eyesore and the area would be better put to use to enhance the nature of our area instead of making it "Industrial". It is also near the school and I think traffic and safety of our children come first. Our daughter has enjoyed the Yankalilla Area School and I have been so pleased for her to grow up with a lot of nature around her and plenty of fresh air. So yes it is wonderful that there will be growth but there must be a way to keep the "Essence" of our beautiful country towns maybe with strong thought on design, renewable energy, and plenty of trees!Yours sincerelyWillow Thomas

WillowThomas about 3 years ago

Dear Council,I agree completely with all those negative comments in relation to the bulky goods, etc. area proposed for the area between Yankalilla and Normanville. My particular concerns are several. Firstly - the existence of such and area would be an ugly site for all people driving past; visitors come here (I am sure) because they want to get away from the ugly buildings, the traffic lights and the hustle and bustle so why introduce some of that to an area these people are wanting to visit to get away from that very thing. They come here for the lovely beaches, the rolling hills, the open spaces and the lack of city complexity. Whilst the district may need such a site it needs to be situated elsewhere. Council and community focus clearly seems to be that of enhancing the beauty of the area and the location of such a site will be greatly detrimental to this. Secondly - as a police officer I also see potential traffic congestion as a result with vehicles of every description entering and leaving the area. As has already been identified traffic usage along Main South Road peaks over the summer months and can be (locally at least) quite significant. The existence of a site such as this (which includes a petrol station) will introduce traffic complexity and risk that we really don't need. I have lived in this area since 1996 and have seen traffic flow, both winter and summer, grow exponentially over that period and clearly this trend will continue. We haven't had our population boom yet(like Goolwa and Victor Harbor) but I am sure this will occur so we need to plan ahead for population growth and associated traffic flow increase as well. Thirdly - the linear park is such an excellent concept which greatly enhances the area. A walkway/bicycle path between Yankalilla and Normanville (and perhaps extended beyond this) would add to the aesthetic utility of the district for visitor and local alike. This would encourage the healthy use of the area and enhance the linkage between the two towns. This pathway, traversing the banks of the Bungala, would encourage visitation to the area also; however, the existence of a bulky goods site like this would be visually detrimental to this entire concept. We have the chance to create something a little bit unique and interesting here, so let's not spoil it. Thirdly - traffic flow past the Yankalilla Area School is already a problem from time to time. I have attempted to have this addressed in the past without any success; having a meeting of the appropriate people not long after I started work here and raising it from time to time ever since without success. This needs to be addressed again with a view of appropriate speed control past the school being the main objective. Fourthly - any consideration of diverting Main South Road from its current route will need a great deal more planning and consultation to have the most desired outcome as any diversion will be a tricky business.Regards - Steve Cracknell

steamboatbilly about 3 years ago

Dear Council,I strongly disagree with the proposed location of the petrol station and bulk storage sheds on the land between Yankalilla and Normanville and the close proximity to the Bungala River. The townships of Yankalilla and Normanville attract both tourists and residents because of their quiet distinctly rural nature. To create an industrial district along the stretch between the two towns will totally spoil the rural nature and the Bungala River, both aesthetically and environmentally. I believe more could be achieved in this area by continuing the walkways and park to encourage people using the area for recreation and healthy activities.I would like to see the industrial buildings located near the others in the area at the end of the town towards Inman Valley, and the petrol station perhaps near Yankalilla Seeds where it will still be available for traffic through to Kangaroo Island and not too far for locals.I strongly support the letters written by Guy Maron and Anatoly Patrick.Please reconsider these plans.Yours sincerelyRhonda Smith

Rhonda Smith about 3 years ago

As a resident and ratepayer, I am not in favour of rezoning the area between Yankalilla and Normanville for bulk storage and warehousing.Others more articulate have already expressed their concerns and I fully support their submissions.Gayle Jones

Gayle about 3 years ago

Dear Council,As a property owner and ratepayer of 20 years' standing, I believe there should never be any commercial development at Carrickalinga, even if only a café, as it would have adverse environmental impact. The beauty of Carrickalinga is that it doesn't have this and thereby retains its appeal for ecotourism. Please let us leave the commercial activities to Normanville and Yankallila, which are already thriving. Please, please no more housing development for Carrickalinga either. Let it reflect the ecotourism success of Kangaroo Island and build on that by strongly resisting development, protecting the sand dunes and crystal clear ocean, reinvigorating the hooded plover population and caring for our fragile environment. I also agree that an industrial area (service station and storage sheds) between Yankallila and Normanville is a very bad idea for the same reason. Let's be smart and capitalise on our amazing assets.

Dr Sue Anderson about 3 years ago

Dear Council Members,Please accept this as an indication of my strong exception to any rezoning of land between Yankalilla and Normanville.As someone who loves our District – and who has promoted it through the media and within Government for 28 years - I am very concerned at what I perceive as the almost “anything goes” approach to development. This will ultimately prove to be counterproductive. Aesthetics (and the new housing estate off Hay Flat Road is a stunning example) appear not to be a major consideration for the YDC, albeit that some aspects of your Plan are commendable.I strongly support architects Guy Maron and Anatoly Patrick's submission. Yours,Chris RannTonto Homestead,Tonto Road, Hay Flat

Chris Rann about 3 years ago

Dear CEO and Elected Members, I wish to make my feelings known as a local rate payer and owner of a house at 166 South Road, Yankalilla. My main concerns are in relationship to planning of putting new storage sheds along the Bungala River in conjunction with the new petrol station complex. Firstly, I don't agree with the service station going there nor the storage units/sheds - I very strongly disagree with the chosen site and strongly support the letter sent to you by Guy Maron outlining the reasons why. In summary my reasons are as follows; 1) the district already have storage areas need Kemmis Hill Rd. so why can not this area be improved/re-planned for more. 2) how many people and who will actually use these proposed new facilities - locals, weekenders or people who pass through or come to the area only now and then. 3) there should be a continuous green belt along the River Bungala from Normanville to Yankalilla where the flora and fauna can maintain a cleaner environment. A green belt will help to maintain a cleaner, healthier flow of water into the sea. 4) the storage units/sheds and service station will destroy the landscape forever once allowed and put in. 5) we have a unique landscape that no other area of SA has so why destroy it when there are other options 6) from the hill, looking down over the valley to the farmlands, and from the road, you will see this ugly row of sheds and the sun glare off these structures which will also damage the pristine view and landscape 7) if the Council wants to in the future produce a linear path of beauty and of tourism activity along the Bungala from Normanville to Yankalilla, which I would support, why destory it with tin sheds ....... I would not use it or promote the path. The potential of a great tourist track/path would be so beneficial to the district and it should not be allowed to be destroyed. Sincerely yours, Dale Bagshaw, 166, South Road, (rate payer for 20+ years). Phone 0408805641

Bagshadm about 3 years ago

I would like to see a link between commercial and residential by adding large hanging pots of colour per building throughout the main street(s) through a street improvement scheme. The integrity of the area is about how appealing you make it for visitors. If owners were asked to improve their road verge, small incentives from council guided by the historical & significance plantings existing & pre existing i.e. Norman Avenue with historical olive tree plantings to be reestablished to complete the walk as an attraction to this area. Jetty Road with significant trees council to inform residence they are to leave the pruning to the skill of council gardeners to preserve for the future. Some preservation is needed here.That Foodland, Normanville be approached to paint the brick wall facing the main street in keeping with the historical feel of the town.That a child's inclusive playground, be developed similar to Loxton , SA, planning and implementation by one person and council funding has turned the small businesses around, especially on weekends. In my opinion it has now changed visitor patterns travelling from the Monash Playground and now to the Loxton Playground because of its integrity to community and family. Elderly people being particularly catered for whilst watching their grand children explore.Thanks.

1 Court Lane about 3 years ago

Dear Council,I write as part of the public consultation regarding the draft Structure Plan, May 2017. While many aspects of the draft Structure Plan have merit, including the proposed Bungala Linear Path, I have concerns regarding the proposed Bulky Retail Goods Area on South Road, between Yankalilla and Normanville, as described on page 33 of the Draft. As a local architect and resident of the Fleurieu Peninsula I have the following concerns:Preserving separation The location of the Bulky Goods Retail Area will infill a critical piece of green band between the two townships of Yankalilla and Normanville, blurring the distinction between the two townships. This is expressly against the aims of the District 30 Year Plan and the wishes of many people consulted for this plan. The proposed site is the last green space between these two towns, and should be retained as a visual break, helping to preserve the unique identities of Yankalilla and Normanville. Country town characterA continuous ribbon of urban development between the towns would create the feel of urban sprawl, antithetical to the small rural-town character of Yankalilla and Normanville, and again counter to the aims of the District 30 Year Plan.Tourism and communityThe context of these townships is a precious natural asset and important to tourism - the green surrounds are one reason why people visit this peninsula - to see and be in the country. A soulless bulky and retail development would destroy the sense of these townships being nestled in the countryside and compromise them as a destination. Natural beauty is increasingly being recognised as having an economic value - beautiful places are destinations in their own right, bringing visitors, boosting local business, attracting permanent residents and population growth, and contributing to a sense of place, community and wellbeing. (Reynolds: 2016, McCarthy: 2015, Moore: 2012) Aesthetics, ecology, and wellbeingThe last two decades have seen a surge of planning and design research which points to the importance of an aesthetically pleasing built environment for the wellbeing of the community. ( Sussman & Hollander: 2015, Ellard: 2015 ) It is hard to see how a bulk goods retail area, with generic buildings, large signage and bland design would contribute an uplifting aesthetic to the locality. Moreover, research clearly shows that green spaces and green belts play a role in the health of communities - promoting emotional health, facilitating social interaction and recreation… as well as preserving natural ecosystems. (Gehl: 2010, Montgomery: 2013, Louv: 2012, Kellert: 2012, Aust Govt. Department of Health and Aging, Healthy Spaces and Places - Design Principles: 2009) As a restoring green space and precious habitat, great care must be taken with the Bungala Valley, especially when considering which built forms should be allowed. I don’t consider a Bulky Goods Retail Area a sympathetic development for this beautiful valley. Cautionary examples on the Fleurieu PeninsulaThe council need not look far for examples of other planning disasters. Two other Fleurieu townships have been destroyed by poorly planned retail and industrial strips:McLaren Vale’s Main Road once connected two distinct settlements –over the decades unthinking planning has resulted in this road becoming one continuous strip of retail and light industrial development. The township no longer has any coherence or a recognisable centre, and the main road is an unsightly mess of an assortment of residential, retail, office, and bulky goods. Supposedly the gateway to the southern wine region, the council continually struggles to make Main Road appealing and spends enormous sums on retrospective improvements which do not erase the problem that this strip is aesthetically ugly and incoherent, unfeasibly long for shoppers, hostile to pedestrians and uninviting for recreational use. At Victor Harbor the spectacular bay and countryside setting is overwhelmed by kilometres of light industrial, bulky and retail development on approach. Large signage, generic utilitarian buildings, inconsistent setbacks and bland design have made the outskirts of Victor unduly sprawled and impossible to access without a car, aesthetically ugly and a hostile zone for pedestrians. A travesty for this Fleurieu Peninsula community and a dismal welcome for tourists.Planning successes:In contrast, the small historic townships of Yankalilla and Normanville have considerable appeal – a human scale, walkable distances, identifiable centres, a coherent visual aesthetic, high (mostly) standards of craftsmanship and design, some (although not enough) street trees, green spaces/parks, communal meeting places and the rural/coastal context are all essential to their charm. These are qualities worth preserving and elaborating and are the reason why, for example, the town of Willunga is also a thriving community and tourist destination.I believe council need to seriously reconsider what they are allowing here and protect their assets; the proposed location of the bulky good retail area is not a good fit on many levels. Yours sincerely,Anatoly PatrickARCHITECT (REG NO. 3106)B.ARCH (HONS)MEMBERSHIPSSOUTH AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTSMCLAREN VALE BUSINESS TOURISM COMMITTEE MEMBERALDINGA BUSINESS AND TOURISM ASSOCIATION COMMITTEE MEMBERONKAPARINGA ECONOMIC AND DEVELOPMENT FORUMBibliography:Australian Govt Department of Health and Aging: Healthy Places and Spaces – Design Principles, 2009; http://www.healthyplaces.org.au/site/design.phpEllard, Colin, 2015; Places of the Heart – The Psychogeography of Everyday Life Gehl, Jan, 2010, Cities for PeopleKellert, Stephen M., 2012; Birthright – People and Nature in the Modern World.Louv, Richard, 2012; The Nature Principle – Reconnecting with Life in a Virtual Age.McCarthy, Michael, 2015; The Moth Snowstorm – Nature and JoyMontgomery, Charles, 2013; Happy City – Transforming Our Lives Through Urban DesignMoore, Alan, 2016: Why Beauty is Key to EverythingMoore, Rowan, 2012; Why We BuildReynolds, Fiona, 2016; The Fight for Beauty – Our Path to a Better FutureSussmann, Ann & Hollander, Justin, 2015; Cognitive Architecture

anatolypatrick about 3 years ago